Sarah Taylor & the Global Gratitude Alliance


Sarah Taylor & the Global Gratitude Alliance

One of the better things about having a retail store is that we often get to interact with people outside our normal sphere of influence. It keeps things lively and at its best it open us up to new passions and commitments. And its with thanks to Sarah Taylor, who moonlights as a part-time associate in the store, that the Global Gratitude Alliance's trauma heeling program was brought to our attention. Sarah Taylor 3 Coclico [read_more] Sarah is a NYC social worker by trade and practice. It is much to our benefit that when she decided she wanted a little variety in her life it took the shape of a retail job.  We're all better for her influence! This summer Sarah will be traveling to Nepal on behalf the the GGA SETH program, a global mental health initiative that sends professionals to teach women living in impoverished and trauma stricken populations tools for helping heal themselves and their communities. SETH primary image We are joining her in raising awareness of efforts being taken by the Global Gratitude Alliance and hope to help her reach a $10K fund raising goal that will help continue the much needed work of this organization. We'll be offering 'thank you' gifts for donations of $50 - $99 receive a bottle of Organic Mallorican Olive Oil $100 - $249 receive a Coclico card keeper $250 + receive as our 'thank you' a Coclico x Odette brass piece Click here for information on how to donate Sarah shared more about the program and her involvement in this very personal interview: [read_more] on the GGA SETH PROGRAM  There is no “healing expert” but, instead, healing activists (licensed mental health professionals trained in the SETH model) who support the community with psychoeducation, mindfulness, somatic healing, creative arts, and social rehabilitation. It’s about placing the power of healing directly into the hands of survivors, so they can break cycles of trauma and abuse and create new legacies of compassion, kindness, and self-sustainability. It is grassroots.  It is culturally adaptable. It is innovative. And, it is so deeply needed. SETH iamextraordinarygirls on MEANING MAKING    When I first joined the program, Amy, the co-founder, would ask me: What is your medicine? Meaning, what drives you forward - what propels you in this work? Initially, I brushed off the question. But since then, I’ve dug. It’s prompted deeper questions, thinking, dreaming, and visioning. I've learned a lot about my family, my own lineage of intergenerational trauma, and it does fuel me forward. It's an amazingly valuable question. But, when it truly comes down to it, my medicine lies in the cultivation of community and togetherness. It's connectedness, it's recognizing our shared humanity, and it's standing together for meaningful, real, and raw purposes. on THE PERSONAL    I’ve learned that, as a healing activist, I have to channel the personal and my family’s history- my grandmother, my great grandmother, and so on. Their experiences have an effect on my approach and my impact in this work. It’s terrifying! It’s been a challenge to bring this openness and vulnerability into the work in ways that I’m not used to… but I’m doing it. And I’m doing it to honor those women who have shared their truths, their strength, and their will with me and, maybe more importantly, to honor those women and girls around the world who still need their community to help them to build resources, safety, and connection to their inner healer. And I invite my Coclico community to join me! on INWARD DIGGING     Like many others, I have my own traumas, and I have inherited intergenerational trauma. My grandmother, raised amidst silenced stories of family lost in the Holocaust, and her grandmother, who lived and died in a shtetl in Poland, have experienced the inhumanity of prejudice because of religion. Their stories and experiences have, inevitably, been carried forth in my mother, in my sister, and in me. Trauma is universal. Whether small or large, inherited or experienced, we are all survivors of trauma. It’s simply part of being here, on this planet, alive in this world. Despite this, my grandmother is also someone who emanates inordinate amounts of strength and hope. As far back as I can remember, she’s shared, both explicitly and implicitly in her ways of approaching her days and challenges, messages of courage, of an obligation to kindness, and of our responsibility to healing this personal and universal pain and suffering. She, to me, epitomizes hope and joy. Please join us in supporting Sarah's continuing work with Global Gratitude Alliance by donating today!